July 11, 2022

#1 Agent In The USA To CEO Of Keller Williams With Chris Heller

#1 Agent In The USA To CEO Of Keller Williams With Chris Heller

Welcome back to the Mario Dattilo Show Podcast, Hosted by Mario Dattilo. On this episode of the Mario Dattilo Show Podcast, Mario talks with Chris Heller, the former CEO of Keller Williams International and real estate tech investor and CEO. Mario and Chris discuss several interesting topics related to how AI is affecting real estate, Zillows home buying model flop, expanding a company internationally, and what got Chris to #1 agent in the country before becoming CEO of Keller Williams and a whole lot more.

Chris' Bio:
Earning his real estate license when he was just a sophomore in college, Chris Heller rose to become the leader of the largest real estate company in the world - and didn’t stop there.

Early on, Heller was named Rookie of the Year in 1989 before becoming the top-producing agent in San Diego County and the No. 1 Keller Williams associate in North America. He has consistently set new records and standards across the industry for more than 30 years.

As Chief Real Estate Officer at OJO Labs, Chris’ vision has shaped partner strategies and a cohesive structure between real estate professionals and OJO. His highly-respected expertise as the former CEO at Mellohome and former CEO at Keller Williams Realty International (KWRI) has helped him grow as an executive and create sustained success as a leader. All this while leading the Heller The Home Seller Real Estate Team, which has sold more than 100 homes a year for 30+ years.

A growth expert, as President of KW Worldwide, Chris launched the company’s first regions outside of North America, resulting in record productivity and profitability. As CEO at KWRI, he led its transformation into the technology company and powerhouse company it is renowned for today.

As CEO of mellohome, Chris is credited with setting the strategy, led cross-functional groups accountable for simpler and smarter consumer homebuying, financing, and improvement experiences. Under his leadership role, mellohome doubled its growth, while improving the experiential and product landscape for the homeownership industry.

Innovative, ambitious, and results-orientated, Chris Heller is a positive and strategic thought leader whose expertise is sought on multiple platforms. He is a dynamic speaker who shares his proven leadership philosophy with audiences across the country. In his debut book, Dominant Thoughts, Heller shares his simple, yet powerful success strategies, and the mindset that helped unlock his impressive achievements as a leader in sales, productivity, prosperity, relationships, and happiness.

A native of southern California, Heller remains at the top of his game by staying physically and mentally fit through daily exercise and reading. Heller has traveled extensively and makes the most out of family time with his wife and their four adult children.

Find out more about host, Mario Dattilo, at MarioDattilo.Net

Talking Points:
01:08 - How Chris Heller became CEO of Keller Williams International
04:14 - Transitioning from entrepreneur to corporate exec mindset
06:48 - Chris' current business
08:56 - AI technology in real estate in the future
12:09 - How tech will change the role of real estate agents
16:40 - Commercial real estate and technology
19:04 - Zillow failed at buying homes
22:18 - Keller Williams' multi-level marketing model
24:36 - Expanding a real estate company internationally
29:46 - What made Chris #1 agent in the US
33:09 - Next steps
35:54 - How to connect

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Links & Mentions From This Episode:
Chris' Book-
Dominant Thoughts by Chris Heller
www.Dominantthoughts.com

Transcript

Mario Dattilo
Hey guys, welcome back. I am really excited because I've got a super cool guest on today. His name is Chris Heller and he's got a very impressive background, both on the real estate brokerage side, corporate commercial or corporate real estate background, as well as AI and some really cool startups. We're going to have a very deep and fun conversation here, so make sure to stick around until the end. Chris, thank you so much for being on, man. I really appreciate it. I'm excited about this interview. 


 00:32

Chris Heller
I'm looking forward to it also. 


 00:34

Mario Dattilo
Chris has got, like I said, a very unique background. Maybe you could kind of walk us through Chris. What, what your, how you got into Keller Williams, which is a company we are all very familiar with and kind of your brokerage and to corporate and then kind of where you're at today. 


 00:52

Chris Heller
Yeah. I started off as a real estate agent and I got my license when I was a sophomore in college and, became a residential agent. I got off to a fast start. I was rookie of the year in San Diego. I became one of the top 10 agents, top 10 in the country for the national brand I was with at the time. In 2004, I joined Keller Williams as an agent started some Keller Williams franchises by 2009. I was the number one Keller Williams agent in the world. In 2010, I, I took an executive position with the company and became the president of our worldwide division. That was the division that was tasked with expanding Carowinds globally. Like Kelvins had just been in north America up until that time. Most of the other national brands, the Remax is central to Warren's. Coldwell bankers have been international for years decades. 


 01:47

Chris Heller
So, so for five years, I, I did a lot of traveling and started Keller Williams and 20 some other countries. They asked me to take over the whole company to become the CEO, which I did in 2015. I ended up leaving Keller Williams in middle of 2017 and focus on some, a lot of advising companies on the board of some companies. I met the founder of loan Depot and ended up joining him, becoming the CEO of their sister company called mellow home. Eventually took a full-time role with a company that I was on the board of called Ojo labs out of Austin, Texas. That was in almost three years ago. I got my real estate team help, a lot of different prop tech companies and including building our own and have been in the industry just solid I've ever done. 


 02:46

Mario Dattilo
Wow. So what's really cool about this. As you see this high performance attitude, you've made it to very high level on the brokerage in the brokerage world, right? Transactional, you guys are selling home selling. Was it mostly residential or commercial as well, or? 


 03:03

Chris Heller
Well, mostly residential. We were in San Diego just selling mostly residential. 


 03:07

Mario Dattilo
Awesome. You're performing at a really high level in a very competitive space in a very competitive market and you make it to the top of each company that you're in. You go to the corporate level, which, what impressed me is that we all know Keller Williams. That's one of the top brokerages in the world and to go from a BR the brokerage to then, to the corporate, not only into corporate, but to be ended up being the CEO of the entire company. That's huge. Also even like loan Depot well-known company. So the track record is impressive. One thing I was going to ask you is, going from the brokerage world to more of a, expansion into corporate, you said you did international expansion. What is, what kind of mindset changed do you have to go through to go from like transactional to all of a sudden like, Hey, we're going to go open up 20 something, other countries and licensing and everything that goes into that to expand a company like that. 


 04:08

Chris Heller
Yeah, it's this, Mario, it's not, yeah, there is, there definitely is a mindset shift and not just going from transactional to, large corporate in, in, enterprise type transactions, but also going from a, a, a Solopreneur, an entrepreneur self-employed to then being in a, an executive role. And, you know, that was much different. Right? I had to prepare myself for that. Now the good news is I always operated. I didn't really have to change how I operated because I always operated it, treated what I did like a business. Unlike most agents, I, I actually operated like a real business, monthly PNL. I had a schedule, I had a, that I followed and I really operated like I was in a role working for a company, even though I was just working for myself. That part of the transition was more natural and easier for me. Cause I, it didn't require me to change how I operate or how I thought about things. 


 05:22

Chris Heller
Obviously, when you're a bigger organization, and you're used to doing things on your own or getting things done on your own, then you have to develop other skills or develop them at a higher level. Like my skills of succeeding through others and working collaboratively, and those types of things were definitely areas that I had to put a lot of attention and focus on to do it well. 


 05:48

Mario Dattilo
Oh, I believe it. I mean, it's different from when you don't have an assistant or maybe you just have one assistant and you're, like you said, you're responsible for getting things done and all of a sudden you've got an entire company that works for you, and you've got to delegate, you've got to know who does what and really get the impact and get the results through other people. It's very different than doing it all yourself or having a very small team. So that's cool. I was going to ask you just so I'm on the same page and all our listeners are on the same page. What is your main focus right now? Right, 


 06:20

Chris Heller
Right now with Ohio labs, we have what we described as a two-sided marketplace. We have consumers by the hundreds of thousands, actually by the millions of visitors every month, our site. On the other side, we have service providers, real estate agents, loan officers, and we help consumers wherever they're at in the real estate journey, get what they need, whether it's a question answered or introduced to a great agent who can help on seller home or buy a home. That sounds well, it is on the surface, a very simple business. When you, when you think about that way, the level of detail, the amount of technology, the human and machine interactions with both both service providers and the consumers is very significant. I spend my time working on the side of the business, the real estate side of the business, because that's my expertise. I, I spent part of my time with our product and engineering teams, helping them understand why some of the things that they think logically would work, won't work and, and how they need to be thinking about real estate agents, how they need to be thinking about consumers and this dynamic that happens in a real estate transaction. 


 07:44

Chris Heller
I also work with our, we have 140% concierge team that's interacting with consumers, real estate agents. We have a success team, a customer service team, all those teams that are interacting with consumers and with our partners on the service provider side. I oversee all those areas of the business. 


 08:08

Mario Dattilo
Super cool. So, there's one thing that I picked up from what you said, and you used a different term than I did in prep for this, but it's AI. I mean, you're using some machine learning machine interaction with the people. I think what people aren't recognizing is that real estate is going that direction. Whether we're talking about, blockchain and title, tracking titles through blockchain, or we're talking about doing, a lot of the manual work using machine and AI, it's coming and it's coming fast. Like companies like yours are already heavily immersed into it. There, I mean, is there something that maybe we as investors operators, brokers should really be paying attention to on that AI side? There anything that is going to really be changing in the future that we're not really prepared for or don't know about? 


 09:03

Chris Heller
Yeah. I think that's a really good question. I don't know that there's, I don't know that there's preparation that needs to be done. There's, there's things happening now that the people probably aren't aware of or aren't through don't they're aware of it, but only at a surface level. Cause they really don't think about it. For example, if you or I go on to a website and look at a product, that product starts showing up everywhere, right? Our Instagram feeds and our Facebook feeds and everywhere that's AI, that's that's machine learning. There's in the real estate space. It's used at all different ways from photo recognition to be able to, to identify what that picture is and be able to identify that to a consumer or if a consumer has a certain need, whether it's on the residential or commercial side, if they're looking for a certain architectural type or a style of a building or interior features, being able to understand what that consumer's looking for and then find matches that have those characteristics or those attributes. 


 10:17

Chris Heller
So, and that's something that we do a lot of, because we have consumers that are looking and we're trying to help them refine what it is that they're looking for. Find better examples or more examples than maybe the initial property that caught their eye. Those areas where, it's already, fully happening and as consumers, whether we know it or not works, we're interacting with artificial intelligence, every day when, or when we're searching on sites and looking at things. And. 


 10:48

Mario Dattilo
Lot of times they know better what we like than we do. 


 10:52

Chris Heller
Hey, if it works really well. I mean, that's one of the reasons why we liked things like Netflix, right. It, were looking for, okay, what are we going to watch this weekend? What are you going to watch tonight? We want, we want Netflix to tell us, Hey, here's this something you would like, 


 11:07

Mario Dattilo
This is what you like, whether you realize it or not, and we're going to put it in front of you so that you have, so you keep watching and stay on the platform. Right. And it's exactly what Google does. It's exactly what YouTube does. I mean, they're just constantly telling you what you already, what they know you like, and there, that's why it's such an attractive place to be Facebook, Instagram, all these different platforms know what we want and they just keep feeding it to us. It's like a drug. Right. So I think that's really cool. The, for, from an AI standpoint or in general technology, I mean, how does that affect real estate agents down the road? I mean, do you think, and I've had this discussion with other people. There going to be a change in the real estate, the current real estate agent's role in a transaction, or will they be eliminated? 


 11:56

Mario Dattilo
Will they be, what's kind of the, any, what are your thoughts on that? 


 12:01

Chris Heller
Yeah, the role of the agent already has changed and it will continue to change technology, drives new behaviors and drives new expectations. And, we either adapt to those or we get passed by because of those. If we look at, if I put my agent hat on my primary role used to be sourcing properties, right? If someone wanted to buy a home, my job was to go find them that home people don't need me for that anymore. People don't need an agent to do that. You can go online and find, every home out there, but is there still a need for agents because they're not finding the properties? Absolutely. There's a, the, just the role, the role continues to evolve and, and that's, that will continue to happen. There are certain things that technology will be able to do that humans have been doing. Whether it's, again, sourcing properties, whether it's scheduling tours of properties, being able to, get more information on properties or more information about things that we're concerned about with properties, whether it's, climate issues or, or, any outside set of data that can be incorporated into the process. 


 13:28

Chris Heller
So those things will continue to happen. The other thing that'll continue to happen is conservative behavior. What can you can do to be shaped by these technological advances and thus will expectations, right? We, we, our expectation levels are really high as consumers, Yeah. If we have to, I share this so last night I was, we have an Airbnb that's been, the renovation is being completed and it's going to be going on the market. One of the last things we need to do is order all the mattresses for all the bedrooms. And, so I'm interacting with a mattress company and I'm live chatting with a certain person. And I want my questions answered. I want to understand the differences. I want to make it easy. They, how can we coordinate this? I've already scheduled how I paid for this. Yeah. I, if there's too many hoops, I have to jump through. 


 14:29

Chris Heller
There were, there came to a couple of points last night where I most, I almost just logged out and just went to the bottom. And, but, to that company's credit, they actually had a pretty good process and they kept me engaged and ultimately we'd finished the transaction, but my, expectations are really high. When you want to talk to a human. And when you don't. It's incumbent upon agents or any service provider to be able to provide an experience that meets and exceeds those expectations. 


 15:01

Mario Dattilo
I, I can totally see that even in our, we have a management company that operates mobile home communities, and the way that we collect rent, the way that we interact with residents is very different than what it was when we first got started. I mean, they've got a portal, they log in, they set up their billing type, they set up their, how they want to receive their statements. They can chat, or they can message internally. They can. I mean, there's all these different things that we've had to put in place to make it convenient for them and to meet their expectations on how they communicate with us, how they pay us, all these different things. Yeah, I mean, we're kind of picky, right? We, we decide how we want it. If you're not, if you're in the service business or any business, really, and you're not making, doing business easy for them, you're probably not going to make it. 


 15:46

Mario Dattilo
It's kinda like if a real estate agent said, Hey, I'm gonna deliver this MLS book to you and you can take a look through that MLS book. Yeah. That's the old technology that person's never going to even pick up that book. They're just going to go deal with somebody else who gives them, the MLS coming to them directly or whatever, online. So I totally agree with you. There, is there anything that you'd say for people who are more on the commercial real estate side that they should be maybe thinking about doing or utilizing technology for that maybe others aren't? Are you familiar with the commercial side at all? 


 16:21

Chris Heller
No. No, I am. It KW, we had a commercial division and I have friends in the commercial business. I'm, I'm currently negotiating on a commercial building in San Diego. I think on the commercial side, I think things are a little farther behind the times. The, that industry has been a little slower to adapt, to change, adapt to the innovation that exists out there. All that means is that there's a lot of opportunity, right? There's a lot of opportunity to be able to surface information, to be able to make it easier. I'm, they're not really utilizing even the technology we utilize on the residential side, like 3d tours and those types of things, I'm trying to, I'm waiting for the broker to go there and FaceTime me and which is fine. I'm glad he's willing to do that, but bill it easier if I could just see the layout of the, of the space and the building and be able to spend time checking it out on my own. 


 17:28

Mario Dattilo
Yeah, totally agree. That is one thing, like what we're doing right now with our mobile homes that we're selling inside of our communities, we're starting to follow it should, it's kind of embarrassing to even use the word starting, but we should've been doing this cause I came from the residential brokerage world before anything, but we're starting to get, do the 3d, little in there and doing some of that stuff and getting professional pictures taken, think about commercial real estate, mobile home park world, which is a very small niche of commercial real estate is so far behind. I mean, it's even further behind than what you're dealing with on the office building or the retailer industrial buildings. It's, it's embarrassing, but it is changing now. I think that's interesting that you say that is Zillow. I mean, is Zillow a direct competitor of Ohio or is a completely different product or service? 


 18:20

Chris Heller
No, I, I would. They're about as direct to competitors as we have. 


 18:26

Mario Dattilo
It so Zillow is buying, see, and this is going to be really interesting to the listeners because again, most of us are on the investment side. Zillow went in, they started buying homes directly from consumers then and there. Of course in the investment world, we're all like, I shouldn't say I was, but a lot of people were saying, they're never going to be able to pull this off. It's so locally focused and all this. And then the argument was, yeah. The data that they have is so strong. Recently they came out and said, they flopped on it and they're going to stop doing that program is there. I'm not trying to have you dog, your competitors or anything. I'm more just curious is that business model of buying homes significantly more complex on that scale than it is to broker, like what you guys are kind of doing and helping people buy for themselves? 


 19:15

Chris Heller
Yeah. I think, I think it is like, there's a couple of different components to it. There's a very strong operational component too. Right? Cause if you're buying properties, you need to be able to really accurately not just using an algorithm, but using, sometimes human input also assess the value of that property and then assess the, what it's going to cost to bring it up to standard or to improve it. What it's going to be worth after you do that. Those were areas that they were really challenged with because they didn't have enough people, boots on the ground in these local markets to truly understand, what they should or shouldn't be paying for the properties. There's the model itself though of I buying or, instant buying is a very attractive model. I think it was a very valid model, right? There's, there's certain amount of people out there who would love to sell their homes, but they don't want to, or can't fix them up. 


 20:20

Chris Heller
They don't want to, or can't have people coming through all different hours of the day, all day long. That need certainty as the timeframe and certainty as to price point to be able to do what they want to do. Right. Or they want the convenience of all that. And they'll pay for that. There's a, even a larger cohort of consumers that say, Hey, I'll deal with all those inconveniences. If it's going to get me more money. And, and we're just going to hire, Mario or Krista to sell our house because we know that will get us the most money possible. For certain consumers, it's a great model for other consumers that doesn't work for them, but it's viable, nonetheless. 


 21:04

Mario Dattilo
Interesting. Yeah. I think you're right. I mean, they almost took on the role of what most investors are doing in there. They're providing a service to a seller. Who's got motivations, they've got, they need to close in a certain period of time. Like you said, they'd need to do renovations and they don't want to do it. They're willing to take a discount just like when you trade in a car, you're trading in a car to a dealership, knowing that you're selling it to them at wholesale, they're going to go then retail it at a higher markup, but it's the convenience and predictability of it versus the unpredictability of listing it and finding out who wants it and what they're willing to pay, 30, 60 days from now. So I totally get that. Jumping back to Keller Williams I know I'm kind of hopping around, but there's something that's really interesting to me. 


 21:53

Mario Dattilo
My first business that I ever started was actually a network marketing business right. In high school and did very well with it. There's one thing that we always kind of noticed or pointed out was that com large companies, including Keller Williams had a similar network marketing or multi-level marketing function. They don't market it that way necessarily, but there is a network marketing platform built into the model. I mean, being on the corporate side and being on the brokerage side, like out in the field, how involved were you or I guess, how do I ask this? Tell me about that functionality within the company and how it helped the company grow or didn't work or whatever. 


 22:40

Chris Heller
Yeah. And, and Caroline's is not the only Germany. There's a couple other companies out there. In fact, there's one very large company, the fastest growing company in the us brokerage company in the U S now called exp, which has embraced the similar structure. At Keller Williams and those at XPL. The con the component or the similarity of the multi-level marketing that you referenced Mario, is that they reward the agents who help the company grow. As an agent, one of those companies, if I influence you to join those companies, you're in another company or you're new to the business and you join the company because of my influence, then I'm going to get benefit for that know, as you get into production and generate revenue or profits, I'm going to get rewarded for that. Same with anyone you introduced to the company. It's a specific structure that was put in place to help perpetuate the growth of the companies. 


 23:40

Chris Heller
And, and it was effective and it has affected. 


 23:45

Mario Dattilo
It. It appears to be even like you mentioned, the XP has a similar business model and Keller Williams was doing it way before he XP, I think, ever existed, but it's, it obviously helped the company grow rapidly and become the massive company that it is. Now, if you're going, if you're expanding into other countries, I mean, how complicated is that? I mean, obviously going into new states as a headache, but going into new countries is like, 


 24:14

Chris Heller
There. 


 24:14

Mario Dattilo
Was for any business. 


 24:16

Chris Heller
Yeah. Super complicated. It was, when you, if I were to magically have you, and I end up in another country right now in a room full of real estate agents, what we would find is to a large extent what those agents do every day is very similar to what we would do here. Right? They're helping people buy and sell homes, but the nuance differences, the cultural differences, the legal differences, the compliance differences, all those differences, then make it. You can't just take what you do here and say, okay, we're gonna go do it in Mexico. We're going to go do it in Portugal. We're not going to do it in Turkey. You have to be able to adapt to those, those local markets. Now, were never, I'm foolish enough to think that were going to figure it out in all those areas. What we, what we knew we could do is find the right leaders in those countries, because I already knew how it worked and then to partner with them. 


 25:22

Chris Heller
To adapt what we do to fit what they do there, 


 25:28

Mario Dattilo
That is really good, because that is cross industry cross, any industry that really applies with expanding and growing a company, you, you can't be an expert in anything, and you got to bring on strategic partners that can help you bolt on and be experts in that region or in that even in that new industry or whatever you're expanding into. That was a very good point that I think listeners can take from that. The other thing I was going to mention is a lot of these countries don't have any licensing. There's no, there's very little regulation. I mean, I know some of the south American countries, some of the European countries, there's just no licensing. So, I mean, are you just basically doing what you do just without having to get licenses and you're just training and recruiting and educating people without having to go through some structured licensing course. 


 26:22

Chris Heller
Yeah. It varies from region to region and country to country, but to your point, yeah. In some countries, that's, the person serving the drinks at night might be your real estate agent the next morning. Other countries have, more structure, but regardless of how much, or how little structure, there's again, taking a processes and models that work in one country and then tweaking them or adapting them to work at another country is where the challenges and the opportunity. And, and, and in a weird way, the fun of figuring that out. Yeah. 


 27:02

Mario Dattilo
I've got a friend in Columbia that does some investing here in the United States. He was kind of explaining to me about what it's like in Columbia and how, and I don't know how much has changed since you were doing it, but he said, yeah, it's not like you just schedule showings and send over a contract. Like they want to sit down with you. They, they want to get to know the buyer and make sure that buyer, it's more of a handshake. Yes. You'll get a contract later, but it's very relational in a country like that. Where some other countries, it's more purely contract. It's very different culturally in every place you go very interesting is, is that, I mean, is that something that most brokerages or companies should probably consider or not consider from a growth standpoint? Is it, is it easier to expand? 


 27:55

Mario Dattilo
I would say a smaller brokerage, maybe not something as large as Keller Williams, but is it easier to continue to grow and maximize their potential in the U S before they go outside? Or would you start say, starting out with an international component would be good. Yeah. 


 28:11

Chris Heller
There's no, I, I don't think there's a right or wrong way at Keller Williams. We took the approach. We weren't going to go international Dubuque until we became the largest or while the largest in north America and other companies went international, much earlier stages. And I've seen it work both ways. I don't know that there's a right or wrong way. It's, it's more, what's the best fit for your company, for your product, for your skillset, your, do you, do you possess the muscle to be able to go do that? If you do, then there's a lot of potential because it's a big world out there. And, and with all that potential that comes, equal amounts of challenges. It's, I think it's case by case where regardless of the company or the industry just looking at, do we, does it make sense for us to go elsewhere if we haven't achieved some level of success while we're currently at? 


 29:13

Mario Dattilo
Yeah. From a, from a brokerage standpoint. Okay. I'm getting back on the ground now, boots on the ground, you're in the brokerage world, you were top performer at multiple companies, and that's not just like top performer in the area or the state company-wide in large brokerages. What's you kind of alluded to a couple of things that you said you were different about than maybe your average estate agent, because you don't get to be a top performer like that, doing it like a lot of the real estate agents. Could you just touch on a few things that you did differently that took you to that high level of performance? 


 29:53

Chris Heller
Yeah. Yeah. I, and were chatting before Mario, I originally wrote a book called dominant thoughts, and that's another real estate related book. It's actually a little, a short business parable, 118 pages long, or the story about this mentor and this mentee, but each chapter in that book, I've taken some of the lessons that I've learned. Some of the things that you're alluding to that helped me achieve a high level of success and that woven it into this little business story. 90% of what it takes to be successful in real estate. I think in many businesses and industries is the mental side of it, the mindset, if you have the right mindset or conversely, if you don't have the right mindset, the magnitude by which it becomes more difficult is almost hard to imagine. And, and so if you have the right mindset, being able to do the things that need to be done every day becomes easier. 


 30:59

Chris Heller
And, and if not, it becomes really hard. A lot of what I did was really worked on my mindset and really develop some strong discipline or some, some muscles of discipline in certain areas of my business that allowed me to optimize what I called my to ease my effectiveness and my efficiency. I knew a couple of things that were common sense, right. I knew I had the same amount of time in the day as everyone else. I knew I didn't have any super powers. I didn't have any super skills. I didn't have any super intelligent, I didn't have any like built-in advantages, but if I could be more efficient and more effective than the competition, then I knew I could do more. So that was really there. I focused working on the mindset, then developing the discipline to become really efficient and really effective in the key areas that drive the growth in a real estate business. 


 32:00

Mario Dattilo
That's good. Yeah. If you guys didn't catch that, you want to write this down and dominant thoughts by Chris Heller, make sure that you pick up that book. Basically what he's telling you is that all the secrets all right in there, but I think it's awesome that you've taken what you've learned and you've packaged steps that people can take that and then run with it and do something with it. I'm looking forward to reading it myself. I think someone who's been at those levels of performance in multiple areas has something to teach is, is what's next for Chris? Like, what's going to be your focus. You're going to continue to build you have any other projects that you're working on or any side things that you do, 


 32:44

Chris Heller
I'm going to absolutely continue to build Joe. The, my real estate team in San Diego is going to continue to help more and more people buy and sell homes. I'm not, I'm an avid real estate investor. I have investments in four states and in multiple properties and they'll, that'll continue. Cause I, I enjoy that. The, the book was a new adventure and that's only been out for a couple of months, but it's doing really well. It's cool to, I, I see a lot of primarily because I'm best known in the real estate industry. There's a lot of people in the industry that are ordering the book, in buy cases for the brokerage or their teams, or they're reading the, Hey, how can I want to order these for my teams? Where's, how can I get a bulk discount, which we're happy to do, but that's a really cool thing. 


 33:37

Chris Heller
In the book is opened up a whole new side of things so that I love, I also love, advising and mentoring, people that are building businesses and then trying to do big things. Those are all the areas that they keep me pretty busy. 


 33:56

Mario Dattilo
Yeah. I think all the other big guys in the brokerage world, they're probably looking at like, oh man, he just put out a play by play handbook. I'm going to go pick that up. If you've done it on the level that you have, that's something that people are going to want to read and take advantage of. I love it is, is residential, even on the investing side is mostly your focus right now, or you said you're buying a commercial building. That for, to use or is that for investment? 


 34:24

Chris Heller
A combination of both. Yeah, no, I'm, I'm open to any type of, any type of real estate, they're residential where we're done most of my investing because it's what I know really well, but, look, if there was an opportunity for a mobile home park or self storage or any of those things, I'm talking to you today from one of my homes here in Whitefish Montana, and this is an area that I'm really excited about from an investment standpoint and those I'm, I, I'm always looking at just the right opportunities and then also doing some development to have a, there'll be a little development project here another year or two. I have one going right now in Eugene, Oregon. And so those are, 


 35:20

Mario Dattilo
Tell me this, Chris, how can people connect with you? How can they find you? Where most importantly, where can they check out your book? Where can they find you. 


 35:29

Chris Heller
You're on any social media platform? I shouldn't say any, you won't find me on Tik TOK yet. Actually I think I am just, my youngest daughter got very into Snapchat. That was a way to kind of communicate with her. I haven't opened that up in a long time. Chris heller.com is my website, Chris heller.ceo. The book is dominant. Thoughts.com is the website, but you can find me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, and please anyone that has any questions. And I'm always happy to help. 


 36:03

Mario Dattilo
Yeah. I love how open, how open of a book pun intended Chris is, and how he's willing to take time out and help people. Like he said, it, mentoring is important to them. And, and so I think that's awesome that you're giving back even after you've built these businesses and giving out good information. Thank you again for being on Chris. I know the listeners got a ton out of this. I know I did. Looking forward to doing some deals with here, doing some business with you in the future. So thank you again, 


 36:30

Chris Heller
Mario. Thank you. Thanks for having me. 


 36:32

Mario Dattilo
Awesome. Hey guys, make sure to check out the next episode, Mario tillo.net for a bunch of information about what I've got going on. Make sure to hit me up. If you want to do a deal together on a mobile home park or self-storage facility until next time. 

Chris Heller Profile Photo

Chris Heller

Author

Earning his real estate license when he was just a sophomore in college, Chris Heller rose to become the leader of the largest real estate company in the world - and didn’t stop there.

Early on, Heller was named Rookie of the Year in 1989 before becoming the top-producing agent in San Diego County and the No. 1 Keller Williams associate in North America. He has consistently set new records and standards across the industry for more than 30 years.

His leadership philosophy and unmatched track record in real estate has provided a springboard for outstanding contribution across many sectors. Heller brings his knowledge and experience to a variety of leadership roles, including advisor, board member, investor, coach, and mentor.

As Chief Real Estate Officer at OJO Labs, Chris’ vision has shaped partner strategies and a cohesive structure between real estate professionals and OJO. His highly-respected expertise as the former CEO at Mellohome and former CEO at Keller Williams Realty International (KWRI) has helped him grow as an executive and create sustained success as a leader. All this while leading the Heller The Home Seller Real Estate Team, which has sold more than 100 homes a year for 30+ years.

A growth expert, as President of KW Worldwide, Chris launched the company’s first regions outside of North America, resulting in record productivity and profitability. As CEO at KWRI, he led its transformation into the technology company and powerhouse company it is renowned for today.

As CEO of mellohome, Chris is credited with setting the strategy, led cross-functional groups accountable for simpler and smarter consumer homebuying, financing, and improvement experiences. Under his leadership role, mellohome doubled its growth, while improving the experiential and product landscape for the homeownership industry.

Innovative, ambitious, and results-orientated, Chris Heller is a positive and strategic thought leader whose expertise is sought on multiple platforms. He is a dynamic speaker who shares his proven leadership philosophy with audiences across the country. In his debut book, Dominant Thoughts, Heller shares his simple, yet powerful success strategies, and the mindset that helped unlock his impressive achievements as a leader in sales, productivity, prosperity, relationships, and happiness.

A native of southern California, Heller remains at the top of his game by staying physically and mentally fit through daily exercise and reading. Heller has traveled extensively and makes the most out of family time with his wife and their four adult children.